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khensley5
khensley5
Grendel's law
Aug 24 2008, 9:20 AM EDT | Post edited: Aug 24 2008, 9:20 AM EDT
On page 93 of my book is described "Grendel's law": there is no limit to desire but desire's needs. It appears that Grendel came up with this concept on his own. I think it means that you can only desire something so much- for instance, Grendel desired to kill people, but once that desire reached a certain point his desire was fufilled. Therefore, he no longer felt that desire. It's kind of like wanting something so much that when you finally get it you realize you never really wanted it in the first place. It's a little confusing though and kind of hurts my head to think about it for too long. 5  out of 9 found this valuable. Do you?    
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kkiracofe04
1. RE: Grendel's law
Aug 24 2008, 10:22 AM EDT | Post edited: Aug 24 2008, 10:22 AM EDT
It almost seems to me like Grendel is simply following his instincts when he goes on his killing sprees. Sometimes, it's like he feels guilty and is left unsatisfied after he has finally gotten what he desires. However, he seems to just feel worse and worse until his desires HAVE been fulfilled. In general, Grendel never actually seems at ease except during the Shaper's songs, which is unrelated to whether or not he has what he instinctively desires. I feel that the idea of "wanting something so much that when you finally get it you realize you never really wanted it in the first place", is very easy to relate to. I think every kid at one point in life has wanted something so much and still been let down when he or she finally obtains what they wanted. 4  out of 4 found this valuable. Do you?    
Ayun
Ayun
2. RE: Grendel's law
Aug 25 2008, 2:53 PM EDT | Post edited: Aug 25 2008, 2:53 PM EDT
It's interesting to see how Grendel realizes his own desire and the limit to that desire. I think maybe it's supposed to contradict what the dragon was telling him: 'to seek out gold and sit on it.' How the dragon was always so greedy. How Grendel thinks there comes a point where you desire it so bad you've lost the meaning behind the desire. Of course the comparison with the dragon could totally be off the mark and random. 5  out of 5 found this valuable. Do you?    

Posted Anonymously
3. RE: Grendel's law
Nov 18 2013, 8:47 PM EST | Post edited: Nov 18 2013, 8:47 PM EST
Grendel has a huge desire to become part of the shapers stories, where he is protrayed as a monster capable of killing them all. Grendel is shocked to see how the human species is capable of killing each other over land and power which to Grendel is just worthless. But as Grendel calls himself "...ruiner of Meadhalls, Wrecker of King!" it just shows there's no limit to his desire, to become part of the shapers stories, that he even accepts to be viewed as the monster and takes the role of one even though he has no desire to scare humans but eventually feels gladness at killing them . He knows he has the power to kill them all but knows that if he does do this there will no longer be a story that he can be part of, so this would be the limit of the desire's needs. 8  out of 8 found this valuable. Do you?